July 25, 2014
crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

(via be-a-riot-grrrl)

July 25, 2014
Out & In

dearoldlove:

I fell out of love with you and in love with my life

(via glitterandthesunshine)

July 24, 2014
person: so where did you learn html?
me: not.... neopets...
July 24, 2014
rosalarian:

Gonna keep a tally of messages I get from a) white feminists completely proving my point and b) people who think this comic proves feminism is worthless because I criticized one part of it. (Even despite me writing these words underneath the comic.) Then I’ll add them all up, see which column has more, and then drink myself to sleep either way.
Haha… this is why we can’t have nice things.

rosalarian:

Gonna keep a tally of messages I get from a) white feminists completely proving my point and b) people who think this comic proves feminism is worthless because I criticized one part of it. (Even despite me writing these words underneath the comic.) Then I’ll add them all up, see which column has more, and then drink myself to sleep either way.

Haha… this is why we can’t have nice things.

(via newwavefeminism)

July 23, 2014

Doctor Who + references in other television shows

(Source: votedsaxon, via doctorwho)

July 23, 2014

2damnfeisty:

Keke Palmer geting emotional in an interview with Raven Symone (x)

This is very important. I’m glad both of them had this moment. Raven has been working and grinding longer than most of us have been able to talk and walk. She deserves all the praises.

(Source: jasonnywithnochance, via yalebuttons)

July 22, 2014
Calliope’s Honoring her Parents.

calliowong:

Hey, everyone.

It’s been over a year now since I started my campaign for trans woman inclusion at Smith College, and I’ve kept silent. I’ve not made any dorky Sherlock jokes or started any conversations about trans equality here, although—in case you’re wondering—I’ve been busy with other activism as part of the SPARKsummit intergenerational, intersectional (international as well) feminist organization. I’m a college sophomore now. The administration at Smith has paid some lip-service to trans inclusion since the campaign and petition, although their current policies are still ridiculous and unrealistic for the majority of trans women. You can read about the recent protest on campus here.

More than a year’s passed since that first letter to you. And life has moved on for me, in a lot of ways.

Me, at the beginning of the Smith Campaign.

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Me, 12:40am, 7/21/2014.

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I’m a premed-track English major at the UConn Honors program, and I’m both scared and excited about organic chemistry with four English classes next semester. I’ve since realized my gaming snobbery and am finally getting into League of Legends. My hair was, indeed, dark green for a while—now it’s fading into gold-brown, a weird color that somehow feels exactly right to me. The biggest change so far isn’t something that visible, though—having a year to figure out and come to terms and grow into myself has been kind to me.

I’m learning to feel my fear, but not to let it stop me or haunt me or turn me back from what I must do. I’m learning to look after myself, too. For once in my life I am aware that the proverbial Stamina Bar™ above my head isn’t infinite, and that it’s alright to ask for help rather than burning out alone. The past year has shown me that I am a person deserving of my own care, my own shield raised high.   

The truth is, it’s exactly my neglecting these lessons that’s prompted me to write this letter. I told myself when I started the first draft of this letter (about half a year ago) that I’d not draw this out more than necessary. It’s difficult, and I’ve been scared to ask for the past year, and I’m scared right now, but I’ve got to ask.

I need your help, everyone, in raising money for bottom surgery—also known as SRS (a somewhat outdated but still-popular term, “sex-reassignment surgery”) or GCS (gender confirmation surgery). I would like to raise $20,000 by August 29th to repay at least the monetary debt I owe to my parents, who have already pledged to fully fund the cost of my bottom surgery. I can only hope that I’ll be able to honor the support and love my parents have given me over many more years.

Of course I’ve been thinking about all the responses I could get for a long time now.

 I understand there are many worthy causes you could donate to, and I’m sure that what I ask seems outlandish. The sheer enormity of the amount I am asking for does not escape me—but the simple truth is that I want to repay in at least monetary terms, what my parents have freely given me.

I am wordlessly lucky to be my parents’ daughter. If not for them, there would be no activist Calliope Wong—there would be no campaign for trans equality in admissions at Smith, or any of it. I understand this is a great deal of money I am asking to raise. The timeframe I am looking at—about one month and a week—is also extremely short. But our power, in numbers, is so strong.

I know that not everyone is able to donate, and that is perfectly fine. Share on social media, if you’re able. I only ask that you remember—over 5,000 people signed the petition for my campaign, asking for trans women at Smith. With 5,000 supporters, repaying my monetary debt is also possible.

I write too much, now.

Just to say:

I would like to pay back the two people behind all of my efforts, my parents, so that I can finally put the question of “should I ask” and “did I try hard enough to honor them” to rest. Please, help me to repay this debt of love.

image

Here’s the donation page.

Thank you.

Calliope.

(via friendswaffleswerq)

July 22, 2014

Me trying to avoid my problems.

(Source: alphalewolf, via mrbenwyatt)

July 21, 2014

immaplatypus:

viva-la-fat:

i wanna punch my computer why all these things with dreamworks better than Disney/Pixar?????

Don’t even with me, when you try to tell me that shit i point to DW’s latest fuck up Turbo and Pixar’s only miss Cars 2 

tell me which is better, cmon

plus I don’t see dreamworks producing anything close to the disney rennaisance except for httyd (which is great like wow)

dont even

dont even with me

If I recall a few weeks back you were fangirling about Shrek?  But in the field of animation (which I suppose you’re referring to as opposed to complex and/or creative storylines, in which case you have Prince of Egypt, The Road to El Dorado, Chicken Run, Shrek, Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, How to Train Your Dragon, Megamind, Rise of the Guardians, and The Croods, for starters), Shrek was not a visual masterpiece in everyone’s opinion.  But this is all a matter of opinion.  Let’s move to some more concrete evidence.

Disney, glorious Disney, while I adore its Renaissance Era as much as the next guy, has also had 77 years to ensnare a fanbase. Whereas Dreamworks Animation was created a mere 17 years ago, and this little fledgeling company has reached a $430 million average gross, surpassing every animation company (including Walt Disney Animation Studios) aside from Pixar.

Now, if we’d care to elaborate to Pixar, it would be fair to say that Dreamworks has some pretty worthy competition.  But to say that Cars 2 is its only flop is a critical understatement.  It’s true that many of Pixar’s films have surpassed 90% on Rotten Tomatoes, and some Dreamworks films haven’t been able to match up.  But lately, Pixar, while they have all my respect in the world, appears to be faltering.  While Cars’s 74%, Brave’s 78%, and Monsters University’s 78% on Rotten Tomatoes are far from unsatisfactory reviews, they’re beaten not only by How to Train Your Dragon’s 98%, but also by The Prince of Egypt’s 79%, Chicken Run’s 97%, Shrek’s 88%, Wallace and Gromit: the Curse of the Were-Rabbit’s 95%, Kung Fu Panda’s 87%, and even Madagascar 3’s 79%.  And the latter was about escaped zoo animals joining the circus.

But let’s ignore the reviews for now, because they’re not always reliable.  After all, Mr. Peabody and Sherman is currently tied with Monsters University when it comes to percentage of critic likeability. While some agree, other skeptics claim that can’t be right.

So let’s move on to comparative flops.

Yes, Turbo was ridiculous.  Yes, Shrek did not need that many sequels.  Yes, we all try to forget Bee Movie ever existed.  Dreamworks has made quite a few mistakes.

But how could Disney ever forget their wonderful gem, Home on the Range?  How about the brilliant spectacle, Chicken Little?  And The Brave Little Toaster was obviously a masterpiece. Best of all, how could we ever neglect that Disney has an entire company called Disneytoon Studios, devoted mostly to cheap, direct-to-video sequels that turn this:

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(Tarzan, 1999)

Into this:

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(Tarzan and Jane, 2002)

Disney has produced over 40 direct-to-video movies just for money’s sake.

Dreamworks has produced one. 

And even then, the animation quality is not the greatest, but, well…

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(Joseph, King of Dreams, 2000)

At least it has, like, actual shading.

But I’ve ranted so long about reviews and box office results that I’ve left out the good meat of this argument, animation.

The Disney Renaissance, of course, started with The Little Mermaid.  A wonderful movie, yes, I’m not going to argue that at all, but let’s take a look at something.

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image

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(The Little Mermaid, 1989)

Throughout most of the movie, save for a few bits of the “Part of Your World” and “surfacing” scenes, nothing on Ariel has a shadow.  Her hair, body, tail, everything, is all one solid color.  The animation is smooth and the movie is beautiful, but it’s not perfect.  This shading didn’t really get utilized in Disney at all until the next year.

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(The Rescuers Down Under, 1990)

(Just a sidenote that the above movie got a 68% on Rotten Tomatoes, lower than multiple Dreamworks movies including Rise of the Guardians and The Croods.  While it is a Disney Renaissance movie [and still a good film], it is often left underrated in many lineups for fear of tainting Disney’s “flawless” image during this era.)

Meanwhile, Dreamworks Animation’s second movie ever produced has animation and shading like this:

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(The Prince of Egypt, 1998)

It’s arguable that The Prince of Egypt had a few years of animation progression on The Little Mermaid, but shading like this is a team effort, period.  There’s people specialized in this.  Was it a matter of technology, or stylistic choices?  It’s all up for debate.

There is, however, the prominent claim that Dreamworks is so much more attentive to fine animation detail than Disney, primarily in CGI.

Lately, this post has been circulating, showing that both Disney and Pixar are just now exchanging their pasty-faced CGI leads for blotchy, detailed skin, while Dreamworks had been using details such as blotchiness for quite a few years now.  But faces are always doted upon.  Faces are the most obvious things noted.

Let’s take a look at some details that both companies could’ve understandably overlooked, but Dreamworks didn’t.

Foot detail.

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(Disney’s Tangled, 2010)

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(Dreamworks’ Rise of the Guardians, 2012)

Ice and snow detail:

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(Disney’s Frozen, 2013)

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(Dreamworks’ Rise of the Guardians, 2012)

Water effect on clothes and hair:

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(Pixar’s Ratatouille, 2007)

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(Dreamworks’ The Croods, 2013)

Now I’ll admit, some of these were super hard to compare, especially the water effects.  After all, looking at when these movies came out, and the progressive allowances of animation for their times, they’re all really great.  Heck, Pixar made the first computer animated movie of all time.  Disney left classic musicals that people will cherish and love for ages to come.  All three companies included in this argument have their ups and downs, and have created pure masterpieces amongst them.  In fact, according to who you talk to, they’re all pretty much equal.

But here’s the reason I stayed up until five in the morning finishing this freaking post.

There is a difference between voicing your opinion and cussing out an entire company and the people that enjoy its work.  To call Turbo Dreamworks’ latest failure (and yes, I know what word choice you used, but I’d rather keep this professional) and imply that both Disney and Pixar are centuries ahead from every other Dreamworks film ever made is horrendously disrespectful to people who have devoted years of their lives to creating these films. To every animator, screenwriter, and director who have worked so hard to bring these stories to life. 

To Brenda Chapman, who, after completing The critically acclaimed Prince of Egypt, became the first female director of an animated movie for a major company (coincidentally, though she came up with the story and had brilliant credentials, Chapman was removed from the position of lead director in Brave during post-production, for hinted sexist reasons that Pixar refused to elaborate on). 

To Chris Sanders, who co-wrote, co-directed, and did storyboard art for Lilo and Stitch, yet left Disney to create How to Train Your Dragon and The Croods at Dreamworks, where he remains today. 

To Jeffrey Katzenburg, who actually worked on The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, and The Lion King, but left Disney to freaking create Dreamworks Animation Studios and give the biggest animation company of all time a run for their money.

Your opinion is not wrong.  Your opinion is not right.

My opinion is not wrong.  My opinion is not right.

They are opinions, but there is a much more tactful way to voice yours when it comes to a movement that has influenced and touched millions of people, even if you cannot see the beauty in it.

So rest assured, even if you take none of my opinions—or even my evidence—to heart, that doesn’t change the fact that Dreamworks is my inspiration, and something I and so many others are willing to protect.

It has given me complex, admirable people of color.

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Women with bodies and hair like mine.

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A pair originally scripted to be gay.

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Original stories that aren’t all pre-written fairy tales.

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And above all, characters I can relate to in their struggles…

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…their imperfections…

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…and their dreams.

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So if you can’t see why people would give Dreamworks as much credit, if not more, than you do Disney, then don’t worry, I’m not angry at you.

I just pity you.

(via surnamecommasarah)

July 21, 2014
white nonsense - the top 10 hits

owning-my-truth:

atane:

When you write about race, the feedback and messages white people send you ends up being the same. They all have the same tired retorts. They desperately need to get new material.

Here are the top 10 hits of white nonsense. There are many more examples, but these are the top 10 imo.

1. Not all white people. These people need a disclaimer for life. They need you to say “not all” at all times. Imagine if you went through life saying “not all” for everything. Person 1 “My daughter is afraid of dogs after the neighbor’s dog attacked her.” Person 2 “Not all dogs attack!”

2. What about Chicago? This is the latest diversionary tactic of white people in the US. Suddenly they care about Black lives in Chicago. Just Chicago btw…lol

3. It happened so long ago. White people are still talking about Roman gladiators and ancient Greek battles, but talk about Jim Crow laws (that ended in 1965!), then all of a sudden, you’re talking about shit older than Adam and Eve…lol

4. What about the Irish? What about them? What does anything about the plight of the Irish have to do with Black people? Anytime you talk about the plight of Black people in the US, white people will bring up the Irish. Was it Black people who subjugated the Irish? I do know that Black people in the Americas have surnames like “O’Neal” etc because they had Irish slave masters. Runteldat.

5. It goes both ways. Deep down they don’t even believe this…lol

6. Every group of people did bad things. Alright, show me the group of people who circumnavigated the world bringing destruction, death, disease and an intent to subjugate the indigenous to take their wealth, natural resources and land. As I say this, you just know some fool is fixing to get in my inbox to tell me about how Eastern Europeans didn’t do what Western Europeans did. See point number 1 to understand this mentality.

7. Get over it. This is always said in frustration.

8. I didn’t own slaves. I have yet to come across anyone who has accused a white person of personally owning slaves in 2014, yet they will protest that they didn’t own slaves. They say they didn’t own slaves when no one accused them of it. Black person “I just read this great piece about the case for reparations in the Atlantic by Ta-Nehisi Coates. White person “I didn’t own slaves!”

9. What about reverse racism? This is a tacit admission on their part that racism is real. So much so that they believe racism against them is the reverse. They think racism should be directional and not against them of course. Regular racism against the darkies is fine, but they will take a stand against the reverse stuff. That’s just going too far. Don’t you know they’re white?

10. Quoting this from MLK Jr. “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” To white people, this is the only thing MLK Jr. ever uttered in life. That is his entire body of work. Oh, and that he had a dream that black people would hold hands with white people one day. For white people in South Africa, you can substitute MLK Jr. with Nelson Mandela. According to white South Africans, Nelson Mandela’s sole purpose in life was to go around telling everyone to forgive white people. South Africa is a rainbow nation now. Yay!

This is a great compilation for White Nonsense in the Age of Obama. Oh and on that point, one last one for all of our favorite racist white liberals…

I voted for Obama!!!

July 21, 2014

huffingtonpost:

DEBI JACKSON, MOTHER OF TRANSGENDER CHILD, GIVES MOVING SPEECH

The best part of the video may be when Jackson addresses the comments she’s heard about her daughter and sets the record straight about statements like you “wanted a girl so you turned your child into one” and “kids have no idea what they want or who they are — my kids wants to be a dog, should I let him?”

So watch the full video to see her answers to those difficult questions here.

(via huffingtonpostwomen)

July 21, 2014
"Seek to be whole, not perfect."

— Oprah Winfrey (via bowsbrosandbacardi)

(via fearlessfeminism)

July 21, 2014

thehpalliance:

"… and to you, if you have stuck with Harry until the very end."

Here’s to book seven. Here’s to the years of anticipation before it and the years of discussion in its wake. Here’s to the boy who lived and how he changed everything.

And here’s to you, if you know that “the very end” isn’t happening anytime soon.

We are book eight.

(via prettybooks)

July 21, 2014
janetmock:

Three years ago, I first told my story in Marie Claire. Today, I am proud to announce that I am joining the magazine’s editorial team as a Contributing Editor. In my role, I will write for the print and online versions of the magazine, act as a brand ambassador and contribute insight and ideas about culture and beauty, politics and pop culture.

janetmock:

Three years ago, I first told my story in Marie Claire. Today, I am proud to announce that I am joining the magazine’s editorial team as a Contributing Editor. In my role, I will write for the print and online versions of the magazine, act as a brand ambassador and contribute insight and ideas about culture and beauty, politics and pop culture.

(via huffingtonpostwomen)

July 20, 2014
"'Just because I got an Emmy nomination doesn't mean the lives of trans people aren't in peril every day.'"

— Laverne Cox (via thisisableism)

(Source: angerisbeautiful-79, via thisisableism)

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